VoiceOver Tutorial - Using the Arrow Keys to Navigate a Written Document

Hey VoiceOver users! Here is a special video I put together which will be part of a series that dives deep into VoiceOver. I've been doing a lot of lessons on VoiceOver basics with my clients so I created this this video on proof reading a Pages document, Word document, Email draft, or any text field you write into on your Mac.

If you're not a VoiceOver user don't worry all the keyboard commands we use in this tutorial work  without VoiceOver on. You just won't hear the verbal feedback.

How to add alt text to images in iWork documents (Mac version)

How to add alt text to images in iWork documents (Mac version)

For my work I often collaborate with a good friend who happens to be blind. We both really like the iWork applications in general but as a user of VoiceOver, Apple's built-in screen reader, she finds the iWork apps to be one of the more accessible options for productivity apps.

Often times the documents that we create are very robust and include images, videos, and audio. When I add audio or video to the project she is able to interact with those elements easily. But if I add an image often times the screen reader will only give her the name of the image which can sometimes just be a series of letters and numbers. Luckily I work has a built-in tool to make these images more accessible.

Click READ MORE to find out how.

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How to write with Emoji on your iPhone and Mac

In episode 2 of the Access Ninja Podcast, Rachel and I discussed the how blind users experience Emoji. Emoji are little symbols you can write with that range from faces like 😄 to objects like 🎉. They are very popular in Japan and are becoming increasingly popular everywhere else. In fact some people may be taking the craze a little bit far.

If you haven't tried writing with emoji before then follow these steps for writing with emoji on your iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

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Accessibility features in iOS everyone should be using: Have your iPhone read out loud to you with Speak Selection

Accessibility features in iOS everyone should be using: Have your iPhone read out loud to you with Speak Selection

So you just found an interesting article online but have your hands full cooking dinner? Why not have your iPhone read that article to you? iOS users with Dyslexia have been enjoying the Speak Selection feature as way to have your device read text from apps like Safari and iBooks out loud. Click READ MORE for step-by-step instructions.

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Accessibility features in iOS everyone should be using: Make nighttime reading easier with inverted colors

Accessibility features in iOS everyone should be using: Make nighttime reading easier with inverted colors

Apple has always made a great effort to make their technology accessible to as many people as possible. This includes leading the way with built-in accessibility features. With iOS 7 not only did they add new features like Switch Access and customizable subtitles, they also moved the Accessibility menu from near the bottom of the General menu in the Settings App to near the top, showing that Accessibility is a priority.

The great thing about building accessibility into technology like the Mac, iPad, and iPhone is that many of these features can be enjoyed by just about everyone. Over the next few posts I’ll teach you about some of the great accessibility features anyone can enjoy, courtesy of Apple’s accessibility team.

Make Nighttime Reading Easier with Invert Colors

If you have played around with reading apps like iBooks and Kindle you might have notice these come with a night reading mode. With night reading turned on the screen displays a black background with white text rather than the traditional white background with black text. At night a black background is easier on the eyes and the screen is significantly less bright making it a lot easier to read. With Invert Colors you can add a nighttime reading mode to any app you want. Click READ MORE for step by step instructions.

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